Arabic/Nat

Russian diplomats kept pushing for a diplomatic solution to the Iraq crisis on Sunday as the military tension continued to mount.

Victor Posulvalyuk, Russia’s special envoy to Iraq, is in Baghdad trying to broker a compromise between the Iraqi government and the U-N.

U-N-S-C-O-M weapons inspectors are being allowed to view some weapons sites, but not the unlimited access the international community desires.

Meanwhile, Saddam Hussein’s son Uday was shown on Iraqi T-V pledging his readiness to take up arms against America.

Russia’s special envoy to Iraq, Victor Posulvalyuk, left the Al Rasheed Hotel in Baghdad on Sunday to try and broker a compromise between the Iraqi government and the U-N.

Posulvalyuk is trying to avert a use of force by the U-S and Britain, with both countries continuing to warn that time is running out.

U-N-S-C-O-M weapons inspectors continued their work on Sunday, but with only limited access to sites of Iraq’s choosing not the unlimited access the U-N wants.

The inspectors are particularly interested in Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s palaces which have been off limits and a bone of contention between Iraq and the U-N.

Access to the Iraqi leader’s presidential palaces is certainly on the table as last minute diplomacy by Posulvalyuk and others takes place.

Meanwhile, on Iraqi T-V Saturday night, Uday Hussein, Saddam’s son limped through the halls of Al Rasheed Hotel.

The reputed drug dealer, who was wounded in a 1996 assassination attempt on his father, had strong words for the U-S.

SOUNDBITE: (Arabic)
“Even though I am carrying this cane it will make me a bit slower, I can’t run with you but it will never stop me from carrying a gun.”
SUPER CAPTION: Uday Hussein, Saddam Hussein’s son

SOUNDBITE: (Arabic)
“I have to be in good shape as it angers our enemies.”
SUPER CAPTION: Uday Hussein, Saddam Hussein’s son

The streets of Baghdad on Sunday seemed normal.

Iraqis read the state-controlled newspapers which contained the usual anti-Western line.

Tensions are high in the Gulf as a diplomatic deal to stop military action seems unlikely, yet is still being pursued.

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