Vanguard Knights (S-Rank Run) Part: 18 (Mission 4-Boss) Steel Diplomacy | HD




Hi everyone, here is the Mission 4 boss (Steel Diplomacy) for the S-Rank Run. Please forgive the quality of the video, or any moments where the game slows …


This video is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Bad Bosses: How to Build a Relationship With a Boss You Hate

When we describe the proverbial "bad boss," we think of someone who is a poor communicator, micro-manager, unqualified or just plain absent. The list can go on and on. It's amazing the impact a poor leader can have on the climate within the workplace, as well as on our health and happiness at home. Studies show that people don't leave companies, they leave managers / supervisors / bosses (you can circle the one that applies). And for those of us who have had "bad bosses," we couldn't agree more.

Behavior aside, another career-killing reason bad bosses are "bad" is because they make easy targets for all the things we don't like at work – why we're not productive, why our team is bickering, why we did get promoted – it all gets laid at the boss' feet. When we have a bad boss, we tend to flip a switch in our heads that turns off our capacity for accepting individual responsibility and turns on our propensity to blame.

I just can't stand the word blame. If you tear it apart, to blame is to b-lame; which, in the very literal sense, means to "b" impaired or disabled. When faced with a difficult boss we too easily give away our power and become the victim. No matter what kind of work climate we're in, however, we always have the ability to decide how we'll respond. And one of the most helpful responses I've found when trying to achieve success in the workplace despite a bad boss is this:

Be Specific!

"Bad boss" is a category. We can't work with, talk to or improve relationships with a category. Instead of focusing on having a "bad boss," we need to clarify what's problematic and why. For example, changing "my boss is such a jerk" to "when my boss takes credit for my work, it really makes me feel angry" starts to move us toward specific behaviors and feelings that can possibly be addressed. Let's get even more specific. From "when my boss takes credit for my work, it really makes me feel angry" to "when" by boss mentioned my marketing idea in our meeting today without giving me credit, it made me feel invisible. " Now we're on to something. It may not be that you have a "bad boss," or even that he "takes credit for your work all the time." Rather, it may be that he doesn't acknowledge your work in a way that is meaningful to you, and that you're shut down during the meeting because of it. Once you know the problem, then you can begin to create a solution for addressing it with your boss who, quite possibly, has no idea he is doing it.

Managers are always given the advice that when they give feedback, they should be specific. The same is true for employees when interacting with their boss. Regardless of title, we're all people whose communication styles and differing perspectives require us to be willing to work on building relationships, not settle for stereotypes.



Source by Theresa Valade

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Bad Bosses: How to Build a Relationship With a Boss You Hate

When we describe the proverbial “bad boss,” we think of someone who is a poor communicator, micro-manager, unqualified or just plain absent. The list can go on and on. It’s amazing the impact a poor leader can have on the climate within the workplace, as well as on our health and happiness at home. Studies show that people don’t leave companies, they leave managers/supervisors/bosses (you can circle the one that applies). And for those of us who have had “bad bosses,” we couldn’t agree more.

Behavior aside, another career-killing reason bad bosses are “bad” is because they make easy targets for all the things we don’t like at work – why we’re not productive, why our team is bickering, why we didn’t get promoted – it all gets laid at the boss’ feet. When we have a bad boss, we tend to flip a switch in our heads that turns off our capacity for accepting individual responsibility and turns on our propensity to blame.

I just can’t stand the word blame. If you tear it apart, to blame is to b-lame; which, in the very literal sense, means to “b” impaired or disabled. When faced with a difficult boss we too easily give away our power and become the victim. No matter what kind of work climate we’re in, however, we always have the ability to decide how we’ll respond. And one of the most helpful responses I’ve found when trying to achieve success in the workplace despite a bad boss is this:

Be Specific!

“Bad boss” is a category. We can’t work with, talk to or improve relationships with a category. Instead of focusing on having a “bad boss,” we need to clarify what’s problematic and why. For example, changing “my boss is such a jerk” to “when my boss takes credit for my work, it really makes me feel angry” starts to move us toward specific behaviors and feelings that can possibly be addressed. Let’s get even more specific. From “when my boss takes credit for my work, it really makes me feel angry” to “when by boss mentioned my marketing idea in our meeting today without giving me credit, it made me feel invisible.” Now we’re on to something. It may not be that you have a “bad boss,” or even that he “takes credit for your work all the time.” Rather, it may be that he doesn’t acknowledge your work in a way that is meaningful to you, and that you’re shut down during the meeting because of it. Once you know the problem, then you can begin to create a solution for addressing it with your boss who, quite possibly, has no idea he is doing it.

Managers are always given the advice that when they give feedback, they should be specific. The same is true for employees when interacting with their boss. Regardless of title, we’re all people whose communication styles and differing perspectives require us to be willing to work on building relationships, not settle for stereotypes.



Source by Theresa Valade

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

From Bumbling Bosses to Cranky Co-Workers – How to Overcome What Makes You Hate Your Job

I’ll be the first to admit that I hated my job. It took many years for me to come to this realization since I kept accepting promotions in the hopes that the awful ache inside of my chest would go away. This ache was not a medical condition … it was me longing to have a career where I could be happy.

I tried to ignore these feelings but instead, the ache became more intense. I expressed to my friends that I was unhappy with my job as a pharmaceutical representative and they told me that I was crazy for wanting to leave such a well-paying job. I became frustrated because I realized that I was going to have to figure this one out on my own.

Now, I am in a career that I love. Ironically, I dedicate my life to assisting others find their dream job. Here are a few tidbits that I teach my clients.

Consider journaling. In journaling, you are able to express your pent up frustrations that you may be feeling about your clients, co-workers or the organization for whom you work. You can also find hidden passions, desires and talents. The best way to journaling is to ask yourself a series of questions. For example, “How did I end up in a profession that I dislike?” and “What is keeping me in my job?”

Too often, people end up in a career that they dislike because they heard that it paid well or perhaps their parents encouraged them to pursue a financially “safe” occupation such as accounting, law or medicine. In other cases, individuals decided to follow the same profession as their parents. Some people say that they have too much debt or a lifestyle to maintain while others say that they just simply rely on their steady paycheck.

Another question for you to you ponder is, “If I had one year to live and I could have any job, what would I do?” Many times, we already know the answer to this question. However, we tend to ignore our passions and dreams because we put limitations on ourselves. We think things like, “I won’t get paid as much” or “It will take me forever to begin my own business.”

After you have discovered your deepest dreams, make a list of the resources and skills that you must possess in order to perform your new job and create an action plan. Recognize that individuals only need to commit one hour, everyday. This one hour will give you the strength to keep the occupation that you hate while you work towards attaining a career that you love.



Source by Theresa Castro

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari