The Me – Too Movement: Relevant / Needed, Too Late, Or Rhetoric?

In the last year, or two, we have witnessed, far more public awareness, of the harassment, etc, experienced, by so many women, and the accused mis – deeds, of many public leaders, and / or well – known individuals. This has brought about a movement, referred to as, Me – Too , which has created a Social Media hash – tag, and the exposure of many people, which has led to, embarrassment, resignation, and / or legal ramifications. However, it seems, enforcement of this, is quite selective, where some accused, have quickly been exposed, and punished, while others, who proceed with a denial – strategy, untouched, at least, to date. The holder of the highest office, in our land, has been accused by more women, than most, with more facts and proof, than most, yet, he has proceeded, untouched, because he proclaims, he is the victim, and his accusers are liars! We are also witnessing a candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court, confronted with accusations of misconduct, several decades ago, and although his accuser came forward, having taken and passed a lie-detector test, and with statements from her therapist, that she stated this in therapy, 6 years ago (well before this particular man, was even mentioned as a possible justice), seemingly unfairly treated by the same Senators, who in 1991, stated, the need for an FBI investigation of an individual, then, refusing to consider, even an expedited one, now, to gather facts, before approving someone to the highest court, for a lifetime appointment. When politics, comes before the public good, there is something wrong!

1. While women have demonstrated, far more political resolve, this year, than ever before, in recent memory, is that enough, when certain right – wing politicians, seem to not care, or fear acting. Is it cowardice, political / personal agenda. self – interest, or fear of opposing the somewhat, flamboyant, occupant of the White House? What seemed outrageous, in the past, when, even when politics, create adversity, is the continuous, negative, nasty, rhetoric, employed by President Donald Trump, and the seemingly, amazing hold, he possesses, and loyalty over his core supporters / followers! We have had female Supreme Court Justices, US Senators, US Congressional Representatives, and candidates for both President and Vice President, yet, women, still seem, to be held to a double – standard, rather than considering, the essential necessity, of treating , women, with the respect, every human being deserves!

2. Is this a result of Mr. Trump's, Presidency, or was he elected, because, so many Americans (or, at least, enough to elect him), feel the same biases and prejudices, and are willing to overlook, nearly anything, in order to get their desired, social agenda, through, regardless of whether it is what our Constitution, and Bill of Rights, represent?

Many feel, the tone of our politics, and national mood and discourse, since Trump, became President, is, at the very least, concerning. Wake up, America, or your children and grandchildren, will live in a country, which is no longer recognizable!



Source by Richard Brody

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Sinclair Lewis' The God Seeker Is Even More Relevant Today Than His It Can't Happen Here

Columnist Alice B. Lloyd, writing for the Weekly Standard , recently published an article about the revived popularity of the novel It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis. That 1944 book about the fictional election of a President who comes to rule the United States as a dictator has been a best seller since Donald Trump took office.

Instead of praising the importance of that book, in her column Lloyd reveals that she described It Can't Happen Here as one of the most disappointing efforts of Sinclair Lewis. She admits that the Minnesota author, as well as the first American writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, has at least four novels that are more relevant today than I t Can't Happen Here.

His classic about a small town real estate agent in the fictional Minnesota village of Zenith, a novel titled Babbitt after its main character, is the first listed by Lloyd in her column. Next up is Main Street , an early feminist account of the ambitious wife of a small town doctor.

Also included as a novel on Lloyd's list is Dodsworth , which chronicles the troubled marriage and life adjustment of a retired automobile baron. The final novel centers on the hypocrisy of a traveling evangelist named Elmer Gantry, which was made into a popular motion picture starring Burt Lancaster as the title character.

The list omits an even better examination of religion in the United States, a novel called The God Seeker . This virtually forgotten Sinclair Lewis book is set in pre-Civil War America, but its message is one that is quite relevant for the religious turmoil we are experiencing today.

Aaron Gadd is a teenager when the book opens, working as an apprentice for a carpenter in a small town in New Jersey. After hearing an evangelist at a revival, Aaron is persuaded to join the man's missionary camp in the unsettled territory that would eventually become the state of Minnesota.

While the missionaries are trying to bring the teachings of Jesus to the members of the Sioux tribes on the plain, Aaron eventually finds himself questioning the many inexplicable aspects at the heart of Christianity. Throughout his association with those he was supposed to convert, the young missionary learns to appreciate the faith of the Native Americans around him.

A Dakota tribesman called Black Wolf causes Gadd to consider some of the eccentric rituals of Christianity, which he claims are more far-fetched than those involved in the worship of his people.

"Naturally, as we know that our God pervades every inch of space, we do not set off any place as sacred to him," Black Wolf tells Aaron. "Christians dare not worship together unless they have built a shelter insulated against evil spirits, and this they call a church, a chapel or a temple."

Aaron has to admit that worship should be done every where, just as the Dakota believe. He is also doubtful, once Black Wolf points it out, of the Christian practice of setting aside Sunday for worshiping.

"Christians have one special day which is sacred to their chief God, while to the Indians every day, hour, minute is filled with duty and gratitude to God," Black Wolf tells Gadd. "His voice is in every breeze, every flowing water, to be revered upon as much on a Wednesday midnight as on a Sunday noon."

Black Wolf also makes Aaron question the ritual of Christian marriages compared to those of the Dakota and other tribes, who are outraged by the pomposity of the wedding ceremony.

"The suggestive rites and hideous jesting of public marriage is the most horrible of all," Black Wolf says of the typical Christian wedding. "Among us Dakota, marriage is a strictly private business between a man and a woman who steal away for a time to consummate their marriage in the sight only of the stars and clouds."

In The God Seeker Sinclair Lewis has shown Americans that it is okay to question your faith sometimes, and allow themselves to listen to how they may be perceived by other cultures. With the religious and cultural divide among the citizens of the United States today, many of us could benefit from reading a 1949 book that, somewhat sadly, addresses many of the issues we have now.



Source by Doug Poe

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Sinclair Lewis’ The God Seeker Is Even More Relevant Today Than His It Can’t Happen Here

Columnist Alice B. Lloyd, writing for The Weekly Standard, recently published an article about the revived popularity of the novel It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis. That 1944 book about the fictional election of a President who comes to rule the United States as a dictator has been a best seller since Donald Trump took office.

Instead of praising the importance of that book, in her column Lloyd reveals that she described It Can’t Happen Here as one of the most disappointing efforts of Sinclair Lewis. She admits that the Minnesota author, as well as the first American writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, has at least four novels that are more relevant today than It Can’t Happen Here.

His classic about a small town real estate agent in the fictional Minnesota village of Zenith, a novel titled Babbitt after its main character, is the first listed by Lloyd in her column. Next up is Main Street, an early feminist account of the ambitious wife of a small town doctor.

Also included as a novel on Lloyd’s list is Dodsworth, which chronicles the troubled marriage and life adjustment of a retired automobile baron. The final novel centers on the hypocrisy of a traveling evangelist named Elmer Gantry, which was made into a popular motion picture starring Burt Lancaster as the title character.

The list omits an even better examination of religion in the United States, a novel called The God Seeker. This virtually forgotten Sinclair Lewis book is set in pre-Civil War America, but its message is one that is quite relevant for the religious turmoil we are experiencing today.

Aaron Gadd is a teenager when the book opens, working as an apprentice for a carpenter in a small town in New Jersey. After hearing an evangelist at a revival, Aaron is persuaded to join the man’s missionary camp in the unsettled territory that would eventually become the state of Minnesota.

While the missionaries are trying to bring the teachings of Jesus to the members of the Sioux tribes on the plain, Aaron eventually finds himself questioning the many inexplicable aspects at the heart of Christianity. Through his association with those he was supposed to convert, the young missionary learns to appreciate the faith of the Native Americans around him.

A Dakota tribesman called Black Wolf causes Gadd to consider some of the eccentric rituals of Christianity, which he claims are more far-fetched than those involved in the worship of his people.

“Naturally, as we know that our God pervades every inch of space, we do not set off any place as sacred to him,” Black Wolf tells Aaron. “Christians dare not worship together unless they have built a shelter insulated against evil spirits, and this they call a church, a chapel or a temple.”

Aaron has to admit that worship should be done every where, just as the Dakota believe. He is also doubtful, once Black Wolf points it out, of the Christian practice of setting aside Sunday for worshiping.

“Christians have one special day which is sacred to their chief God, while to the Indians every day, hour, minute is filled with duty and gratitude to God,” Black Wolf tells Gadd. “His voice is in every breeze, every flowing water, to be revered upon as much on a Wednesday midnight as on a Sunday noon.”

Black Wolf also makes Aaron question the ritual of Christian marriages compared to those of the Dakota and other tribes, who are outraged by the pomposity of the wedding ceremony.

“The suggestive rites and hideous jesting of public marriage is the most horrible of all,” Black Wolf says of the typical Christian wedding. “Among us Dakota, marriage is a strictly private business between a man and a woman who steal away for a time to consummate their marriage in the sight only of the stars and clouds.”

In The God Seeker Sinclair Lewis has shown Americans that it is okay to question your faith occasionally, and allow themselves to listen to how they may be perceived by other cultures. With the religious and cultural divide among the citizens of the United States today, many of us could benefit from reading a 1949 book that, somewhat sadly, addresses many of the issues we have now.



Source by Doug Poe

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Sinclair Lewis' The God Seeker Is Even More Relevant Today Than His It Can not Happen Here

Columnist Alice B. Lloyd, writing for The Weekly Standard , recently published an article about the revived popularity of the novel It Can not Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis. That 1944 book about the fictional election of a President who comes to rule the United States as a dictator has been a best seller since Donald Trump took office.

Instead of promoting the importance of that book, in her column Lloyd reveals that she described It Can not Happen Here as one of the most disappointing efforts of Sinclair Lewis. She admits that the Minnesota author, as well as the first American writer to win the Noble Prize for Literature, has at least four novels that are more relevant today than I can not Happen Here.

His classic about a small town real estate agent in the fictional Minnesota village of Zenith, a novel titled Babbitt after its main character, is the first listed by Lloyd in her column. Next up is Main Street , an early feminist account of the ambitious wife of a small town doctor.

Also included as a novel on Lloyd's list is Dodsworth , which chronicles the troubled marriage and life adjustment of a retired automobile baron. The final novel centers on the hypocrisy of a traveling evangelist named Elmer Gantry, which was made into a popular motion picture starring Burt Lancaster as the title character.

The list omits an even better examination of religion in the United States, a novel called The God Seeker . This automatically forgotten Sinclair Lewis book is set in pre-Civil War America, but its message is one that is quite relevant for the religious turmoil we are experiencing today.

Aaron Gadd is a teenager when the book opens, working as an apprentice for a carpenter in a small town in New Jersey. After hearing an evangelist at a revival, Aaron is persuaded to join the man's missionary camp in the unsettled territory that would eventually become the state of Minnesota.

While the missionaries are trying to bring the teachings of Jesus to the members of the Sioux tribes on the plain, Aaron historically finds himself asking the many inexplicable aspects at the heart of Christianity. Through his association with those he was supposed to convert, the young missionary learns to appreciate the faith of the Native Americans around him.

A Dakota tribesman called Black Wolf causes Gadd to consider some of the eccentric rituals of Christianity, which he claims are more far feted than those involved in the worship of his people.

"Naturally, as we know that our God pervades every inch of space, we do not set off any place as sacred to him," Black Wolf tells Aaron. "Christians dare not worship together unless they have built a shelter insulated against evil spirits, and this they call a church, a chapel or a temple."

Aaron has to admit that worship should be done every where, just as the Dakota believe. He is also doubtful, once Black Wolf points it out, of the Christian practice of setting aside Sunday for worshiping.

"Christians have one special day which is sacred to their chief God, while to the Indians every day, hour, minute is filled with duty and gratitude to God," Black Wolf tells Gadd. "His voice is in every breeze, every flowing water, to be returned upon as much on a Wednesday midnight as on a Sunday noon."

Black Wolf also makes Aaron question the ritual of Christian marriages compared to those of the Dakota and other tribes, who are outraged by the pomposity of the wedding ceremony.

"The suggestive rites and hideous jesting of public marriage is the most horrible of all," Black Wolf says of the typical Christian wedding. "Among us Dakota, marriage is a strictly private business between a man and a woman who steal away for a time to consummate their marriage in the sight only of the stars and clouds."

In The God Seeker Sinclair Lewis has shown Americans that it is okay to question your faith occasionally, and allow themselves to listen to how they may be perceived by other cultures. With the religious and cultural division among the citizens of the United States today, many of us could benefit from reading a 1949 book that, somewhat sadly, addresses many of the issues we have now.



Source by Doug Poe

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

The Me – Too Movement: Relevant/ Needed, Too Late, Or Rhetoric?

In the last year, or two, we have witnessed, far more public awareness, of the harassment, etc, experienced, by so many women, and the accused mis – deeds, of many public leaders, and/ or well – known individuals. This has brought about a movement, referred to as, Me – Too, which has created a Social Media hash – tag, and the exposure of many people, which has led to, embarrassment, resignation, and/ or legal ramifications. However, it seems, enforcement of this, is quite selective, where some accused, have quickly been exposed, and punished, while others, who proceed with a denial – strategy, untouched, at least, to date. The holder of the highest office, in our land, has been accused by more women, than most, with more facts and proof, than most, yet, he has proceeded, untouched, because he proclaims, he is the victim, and his accusers are liars! We are also witnessing a candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court, confronted with accusations of misconduct, several decades ago, and although his accuser came forward, having taken and passed a lie- detector test, and with statements from her therapist, that she stated this in therapy, 6 years ago (well before this particular man, was even mentioned as a possible Justice), seemingly unfairly treated by the same Senators, who in 1991, stated, the need for an FBI investigation of an individual, then, refusing to consider, even an expedited one, now, to gather facts, before approving someone to the highest court, for a lifetime appointment. When politics, comes before the public good, there is something wrong!

1. While women have demonstrated, far more political resolve, this year, than ever before, in recent memory, is that enough, when certain right – wing politicians, seem to not care, or fear acting. Is it cowardice, political/ personal agenda. self – interest, or fear of opposing the somewhat, flamboyant, occupant of the White House? What seemed outrageous, in the past, when, even when politics, create adversity, is the continuous, negative, nasty, rhetoric, employed by President Donald Trump, and the seemingly, amazing hold, he possesses, and loyalty over his core supporters/ followers! We have had female Supreme Court Justices, US Senators, US Congressional Representatives, and candidates for both President and Vice President, yet, women, still seem, to be held to a double – standard, rather than considering, the essential necessity, of treating, women, with the respect, every human being deserves!

2. Is this a result of Mr. Trump’s, Presidency, or was he elected, because, so many Americans (or, at least, enough to elect him), feel the same biases and prejudices, and are willing to overlook, nearly anything, in order to get their desired, social agenda, through, regardless of whether it is what our Constitution, and Bill of Rights, represent?

Many feel, the tone of our politics, and national mood and discourse, since Trump, became President, is, at the very least, concerning. Wake up, America, or your children and grandchildren, will live in a country, which is no longer recognizable!



Source by Richard Brody

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari

Sinclair Lewis’ The God Seeker Is Even More Relevant Today Than His It Can’t Happen Here

Columnist Alice B. Lloyd, writing for The Weekly Standard, recently published an article about the revived popularity of the novel It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis. That 1944 book about the fictional election of a President who comes to rule the United States as a dictator has been a best seller since Donald Trump took office.

Instead of praising the importance of that book, in her column Lloyd reveals that she described It Can’t Happen Here as one of the most disappointing efforts of Sinclair Lewis. She admits that the Minnesota author, as well as the first American writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, has at least four novels that are more relevant today than It Can’t Happen Here.

His classic about a small town real estate agent in the fictional Minnesota village of Zenith, a novel titled Babbitt after its main character, is the first listed by Lloyd in her column. Next up is Main Street, an early feminist account of the ambitious wife of a small town doctor.

Also included as a novel on Lloyd’s list is Dodsworth, which chronicles the troubled marriage and life adjustment of a retired automobile baron. The final novel centers on the hypocrisy of a traveling evangelist named Elmer Gantry, which was made into a popular motion picture starring Burt Lancaster as the title character.

The list omits an even better examination of religion in the United States, a novel called The God Seeker. This virtually forgotten Sinclair Lewis book is set in pre-Civil War America, but its message is one that is quite relevant for the religious turmoil we are experiencing today.

Aaron Gadd is a teenager when the book opens, working as an apprentice for a carpenter in a small town in New Jersey. After hearing an evangelist at a revival, Aaron is persuaded to join the man’s missionary camp in the unsettled territory that would eventually become the state of Minnesota.

While the missionaries are trying to bring the teachings of Jesus to the members of the Sioux tribes on the plain, Aaron eventually finds himself questioning the many inexplicable aspects at the heart of Christianity. Through his association with those he was supposed to convert, the young missionary learns to appreciate the faith of the Native Americans around him.

A Dakota tribesman called Black Wolf causes Gadd to consider some of the eccentric rituals of Christianity, which he claims are more far-fetched than those involved in the worship of his people.

“Naturally, as we know that our God pervades every inch of space, we do not set off any place as sacred to him,” Black Wolf tells Aaron. “Christians dare not worship together unless they have built a shelter insulated against evil spirits, and this they call a church, a chapel or a temple.”

Aaron has to admit that worship should be done every where, just as the Dakota believe. He is also doubtful, once Black Wolf points it out, of the Christian practice of setting aside Sunday for worshiping.

“Christians have one special day which is sacred to their chief God, while to the Indians every day, hour, minute is filled with duty and gratitude to God,” Black Wolf tells Gadd. “His voice is in every breeze, every flowing water, to be revered upon as much on a Wednesday midnight as on a Sunday noon.”

Black Wolf also makes Aaron question the ritual of Christian marriages compared to those of the Dakota and other tribes, who are outraged by the pomposity of the wedding ceremony.

“The suggestive rites and hideous jesting of public marriage is the most horrible of all,” Black Wolf says of the typical Christian wedding. “Among us Dakota, marriage is a strictly private business between a man and a woman who steal away for a time to consummate their marriage in the sight only of the stars and clouds.”

In The God Seeker Sinclair Lewis has shown Americans that it is okay to question your faith occasionally, and allow themselves to listen to how they may be perceived by other cultures. With the religious and cultural divide among the citizens of the United States today, many of us could benefit from reading a 1949 book that, somewhat sadly, addresses many of the issues we have now.



Source by Doug Poe

This article is brought to you by Kokula Krishna Hari Kunasekaran! Visit Website or Follow back at @kkkhari